Psychology 502
Winter, 1999
Instructor: R. A. Kleinknecht, Office Hours: MTW:

Office: Miller Hall 220, Phone: 650­3522,
            e-mail: <knecht@cc.wwu.edu>

WWW: http://www.wwu.edu/~knecht

Text: Abnormal Psychology, (2nd Edition) Authors: Barlow and Durand, and an additional packet of readings in the library.

Week/Dates                   Lecture Topics                                 Text Chapters

1/ Jan. 5-8 INTRODUCTION AND HISTORICAL OVERVIEW.  Ch. 1

Reading:

Lilienfeld, S. & Marino, L. (1995). Mental disorder as a Roschian concept: A critique of
      Wakefield's "harmful dysfunction" analysis. Journal of Abnormal Psychology.

2/ Jan. 11-15 THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVES/MODELS   Ch. 2

Readings:

Bandura & Mischel, Social Learning

Kagan, J. & Snidman, (1991) Temperamental factors in human development, American
Psychologist.

Rutter, M. (1997). Nature-Nurture: The example of antisocial behavior. American
Psychologist, 52, 390-398.

McCrae, R.& Costa, P. (1997). Personality trait structure as a human universal. American
Psychologist, 52, 509-516.

3/ Jan. 19-22, PSYCHIATRIC CLASSIFICATION, DIAGNOSIS,   Ch. 3, 4

Readings:

Smoller, J. The etiology and treatment of childhood.

Persons, J. (1986) The advantages of studying psychological phenomena rather than
psychiatric diagnoses. American Psychologist. 42.

Kitayama & Markus: Construal of the self as Cultural Frame: Implications for
internationalizing psychology

Wakefield, J. (1997). Diagnosing DSM-IV: DSM-IV and the concept of disorder.
Behaviour Research and Therapy, 35, 633-649.

***** JAN. 22, FIRST EXAM: CHAPTERS 1,2,3,4; READINGS; LECTURE ***
 

4/ Jan. 25­29 ANXIETY AND THE ANXIETY DISORDERS Ch. 5

Readings:

Lang, P.J. (1995). The emotion probe: Studies of motivation and attention. American
Psychologist.

Mineka, S., Watson, D., & Clark, A. (1998). Comorbidity of anxiety and unipolar mood
disorders. Annual Review of Psychology

5/ Feb 1-5 : SOMATOFORM AND DISSOCIATIVE DISORDERS.  Ch. 6

Kihlstrom, J. Glisky, M. & Angiulo, M. (1994). Dissociative tendencies and dissociative
disorders. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 103, 117 -124.

6/ Feb. 8-12 MOOD DISORDERS,                                                Ch. 7

Readings:

Luten, A. G., et al., (1997). Pessimistic attributional style: Is it specific to depression
versus anxiety versus negative affect? Behaviour Research and Therapy, 35, 703-719.
 


 

***** FEB. 12th, 2ND EXAM, CHAPTERS 5, 6 7, ; READINGS, LECTURE **
 
 

 7/ Feb. 16-190 PSYCHOSOMATIC RELATIONSHIPS,    Ch. 8, 9,

Readings:
Baum, A. (1994). Behavioral, biological, and environmental interactions in disease
processes.

Kaplan, G., (1994). Reflections of present and future research on bio-behavioral risk
factors.

Maier,.S., Watkins, L., & Fleshner, M. (1994). Psychoneuroimmunology. American
Psychologist 49.

Can Stress make you sick? Harvard Medical School, (1998).
 

Kiecolt-Glaser, J., et al. (1998). Psychological influences on surgical recovery. American
Psychologist, 53.

8/ Feb 22-26 ALCOHOL AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE    Ch. 11,

Readings:

McGue, et al. (1992). Sex and age effects on the inheritance of alcohol problems: A twin study. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 101, 3-17.

Peele, S., (1984) The Cultural Context of Psychological Approaches to Alcoholism. American Psychologist.

Finn, P., et al., (1997). Heterogeneity in families of sons of alcoholics: The impact of familial vulnerability type on offspring characteristics. Journal of Abnormal Psychology. 106, 26-36.

Addiction and the brain. Parts I and II. Harvard mental Health Letter.

          **** Feb. 26, 3RD EXAM, CHAPTERS 8, 9, 11,   READINGS *****
 

9/Mar. 1-5 THE SCHIZOPHRENIAS     Ch. 12, 13
Readings:

Corbitt, E. & Widiger, T. (1995). Sex differences among the personality disorders: An
exploration of the data. Clinical Psychology: Science and .Practice.

Lynam, D. (1997). Pursuing the psychopath: Capturing the fledgling psychopath in a
nomological net .Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 106, 425-438.

Kendler, K.  Karkowski, L. & Walsh, D. (1998). The structure of Psychosis. Archives of
General Psychiatry, 55,492-5499.

Special Report: Schizophrenia 1993: Schizophrenia Bulletin.

Torrey, E.F., et al. (1994). Prenatal origin of schizophrenia in a subgroup of discordant
monozygotic twins. Schizophrenia Bulletin.

Farmer, A. et al. (1987) Twin concordance for DSM-III schizophrenia: Scrutinizing the
validity of the definition. Archives of General Psychiatry, 44.

DeMann, J. First person account: The evolution of a person with schizophrenia.
Schizophrenia Bulletin.

Kagigebi, A. First person account: Living in a nightmare. Schizophrenia Bulletin.
 

10/ Mar.8-12 LEGAL ISSUES IN ABNORMAL BEHAVIOR Chs. 14, 16 

                   ********************************************
                  Final Exam: Thurs. March 18, 8:00 -10:00 am.
                       CHAPTERS 12, 13, 14, 16, lecture, readings
                   ********************************************
 
 
 

Reading and writing assignment for 502

A.  Read the following six papers from:  Clinical Psychology Review: Special Issue:
    “Memory for Trauma: The intersection of Clinical Psychology and Cognitive Science.

Pillemer, D. B. : What is remembered about early childhood events?

Zola, S. : Memory, Amnesia, and the Issue of Recovered Memory: Neurobiological
               Aspects

Hyman, I. E. Jr. & Loftus, E. F. : Errors in Autobiographical Memory

Brewin, C. & Andrews, B. : Recovered Memories of Trauma: Phenomenological and
                                            Cognitive Mechanisms.

McNally, R. J. :  Experimental Approaches to Cognitive Abnormality in Posttraumatic
                           Stress Disorder.

Leskin, G., Kaloupek, D. , & Keane, T. M. : Treatment for Traumatic Memories: Review
                                                                    and Recommendations.
 

B. Pose two questions that you would like to see answered from each of these articles.  As you read these, ask yourself: “What else would I want to know about this area?” These questions will be assessed on how well your questions reflect your understanding of the articles.

C. Write a brief paragraph commenting on your thoughts about the article and what it is suggesting. These can be pro or con, or they can follow up on implications of the article relative to your interests.

There will be up to 2 points per question and 2 points for the paragraph, for a total of 36 points.
 
 
 
 

COURSE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES:

The goals of this course are:

1) To become familiar with the current approaches used to understand abnormal behavior: the biological, psychodynamic, cognitive, social learning, biopsychosocial, and diatheses-stress conceptions. You should be able to discuss the categories of abnormality within these frameworks giving both advantages and limitations. You should have knowledge of biological processes as they affect human behavior, cognition, and emotion and understand social and cultural processes and conceptualizations and how they affect individual's behavior and our interpretations of others' behaviors.

2) To become conversant in the language and categories of DSM IV. This includes background and history of these categories, issues of reliability and validity of the system as used clinically, and the limitations of viewing human behavior within this categorical, disease oriented framework. That is, what are the categories, where did they come from, what do they tell us, and what can they not tell us?

3) To understand current thinking on each condition that we examine. What are the defining characteristics of each condition? How did the condition develop? What are the psychological and biological mechanisms that are operative in explaining disorders? How is the condition now conceptualized and where does the theorizing appear to be headed? That is, what are the current trends, where did they come from historically, and where might you expect them to go in the future?

Overall, the emphasis is on understanding what current thinking is concerning the constructs of abnormality, the data on which the constructs are based, how these constructs can be useful, and how they might be detrimental. You will be expected to know numerous terms that are the vocabulary or language of psychopathology as well as have a conceptual understanding of: a.) concepts of diagnosis including historical, scientific, social, and cultural factors that shape it, and  b.) the several "mental Disorders" in terms of what they are and are not, how "they" develop.
 

Exam Policies:

1. Exams will all be given on exam days either according to the syllabus or with
        sufficient notice of change.
2. The only excuses for missing exams are medical excuses, with note from Dr.
3. Final exam will be given only at the time and date specified on the time schedule.
 
 
 

OVERHEADS:

Overhead Outline of Section I

Anxiety Disorders Outline

PTSD

Hypochondria

Mood Disorders

Psychosomatic

Substance Abuse

Schizophrenia

Legal Issues