KIN 510

Laboratory Techniques in Exercise Science (4 cr.)

Winter 2009

Instructors: Dr. Lorrie Brilla and Dr. Kathy Knutzen

DR. BRILLA:


Office: CV 26

Office Hrs: 10:00 to 11:00am Mon & Wed.; 8:00 to 10:00am, Tues. and by appt.

Phone: 360.650.3056; FAX 360.650.7447

Email: Lorrie.Brilla@wwu.edu

Homepage: http://myweb.facstaff.wwu.edu/~brilla/index.html

 

DR. KNUTZEN:


Office: CV 105 and ES 603

Office Hrs: 9:00 to 10:00am and 11:00 to 11:30am on  Mon., Wed., Fri.

Phone: 360.650.3055 or 360.650.3763

Email: Kathy.Knutzen@wwu.edu

Homepage: http://myweb.facstaff.wwu.edu/knutzenk/

Class Information: http://courses.wwu.edu/

Course Objectives:
1.Students will demonstrate their expertise in setting up a data collection environment (i.e., calibration, establishing sampling and experimental protocols).
2.Students will demonstrate their knowledge of data acquisition processes.
3.Students will exhibit experimentation expertise through working with a large variety of biomechanical and physiological instruments.
General Course Outline:
Kinematics:

  1. Imaging measurement techniques
    1. Motion tracking
  2. Collecting and Processing kinematic data
    1. Sampling
    2. Smoothing
    3. Filtering/spline/fourier analysis
  3. Calculation of velocity and acceleration

 

Electromyography:

  1. What does emg measure?
  2. Influences on the emg signal
  3. EMG instrumentation and procedures

Isokinetic:

  1. Isokinetic hardware
  2. Torque, angular work and power measurements

Kinetics:

  1. Ground reaction force
    1. Force transducers and force platforms
  2. Center of Pressure

Cardiorespiratory Fitness Assessment:

  1. Resting ECG, BP
  2. Predictive exercise tests
    1. Field tests
    2. Submaximal tests
  3. Maximal graded exercise test
    1. Max VO2
    2. Ventilatory anaerobic threshold
  4. Lung functions
    1. Breathing reserve
    2. Respiratory exchange ratio
  5. Cardiovascular functions
    1. Electrocardiography
    2. Blood pressure, pulse pressure, oxygen pulse
  6. Ratings of perceived exertion

Body Composition:

  1. Anthropometric techniques
  2. Hydrostatic (underwater) weighing
  3. Other techniques (BodPod, BIA, infrared refractence)

Biochemistry/Anaerobic Power:

  1. Phlebotomy
  2. Spectrophotometry
  3. Wingate Anaerobic Test
  4. Other techniques

Course Calendar


Week

Mon

Tues

Wed

Thurs

Fri

Readings

6-9 Jan

 

Kinematics

 

 

 

Robertson Pgs. 9-34; 103-124; 227-238

12-16 Jan

 

EMG & Isokinetics

 

 

 

Robertson Pgs. 163-181; 99-102

19-23 Jan

HOLIDAY

Kinetics

 

 

 

Robertson Pgs. 73-99

26-30 Jan

 

Exam: Biomechanics Instrumentation

 

 

 

 

2-6 Feb

 

Cardiorespiratory
Fitness Assessment

 

 

 

 

9-13 Feb

 

Body Composition

 

 

 

 

16-20 Feb

HOLIDAY

Biochemistry/ Anaerobic Power

 

 

 

 

23-27 Feb

 

Exam: Physiology Instrumentation

 

 

 

 

2-6 Mar

 

Project Presentations

 

 

 

 

9-13 Mar

 

Project Presentations

 

 

 

 

16-20 Mar

 

Project Presentations 1:00-3:00

 

 

 

 

Course Requirements:

  1. Exam 1: Biomechanics Instrumentation – January 27 - 100 points
  2. Exam 2: Physiology Instrumentation – February 24 - 100 points
  3. Group Project - 200 points - Due at time of presentation

GROUP PROJECT SCHEDULE AND GROUP


Name

Area

Date

 

Cardiorespiratory/Metabolic Cart and Body Composition and Portable CV measurement system

 

 

Force Platform and Accelerometer System/ XSens

 

 

Electromyography/ZFlo System

 

 

Qualisys/Motion Analysis and Visual 3D

 

GROUP PROJECT EXPECTATIONS AND REQUIREMENTS
Expectations:

  1. 3-5 hours work/weekly on project outside of class
  2. Equal contribution of all group members to the project
    1. Turn in a log signed by all members of the group
    2. Adjustments will be made in the grades of members who do not contribute equitably to the project
  3. Starting at ground zero and taking your level of expertise to that of a researcher/user
    1. Read manuals
    2. Go step by step through the techniques multiple times
    3. Review how others have used the equipment
    4. Treat all equipment with care
      1. Take out and put away neatly
    5. Debug problems as a group and repeat test
    6. Take notes on where you are having problems
    7. All members need to be knowledgeable about all aspects of the equipment and testing
  4. Quality in = Quality out
    1. Quality is the most important aspect of instrumentation
      1. Proper calibration
      2. Accuracy
      3. Repeatability
      4. Safety
      5. Sensitivity

Requirements:

  1. How is the instrumentation used in current research? (50 pts)
    1. Review 10-15 articles published since 2004 that utilized measurement techniques from your area.  If you are assigned two areas, review only 7-10 articles and write up the information separately for each instrumentation.
    2. Summarize in Table format the specifics of the measurement techniques in your selected area. You should include factors such as:
      1. Number of trials typically collected
      2. Sampling rate
      3. Set up of physical testing environment
      4. Calibration techniques
      5. Common variables extracted
      6. Sample hypotheses tested
      7. How the results are typically presented
      8. Data processing techniques (filtering, smoothing, calculations,
      9. Commonly used with what other instrumentation
      10. There will be other specific measurement issues only pertinent to your measurement such as:
        1. force platform – trigger method, speed control or techniques for measuring speed
        2. electromyography – filter and gain settings, electrode placement, size of electrodes, distance between electrodes, amplifier characteristics
        3. motion analysis - # of camers, # of markers, size of markers, placement of markers, type of system
    3. Compile a list of the references you used
    4. Product:  Copy of table and references for all members of the class; submit copy of all materials to the digital dropbox on Blackboard
    5. Grading = 50 pts.
      1. Quality of articles compiled
      2. Relevance of articles compiled
      3. Organization and presentation of the material in the tables

 

  1. What are the procedures for collecting data using my instrumentation? 
    1. Components of the system
      1. Hardware characteristics
      2. Specialized software
    2. Calibration
      1. Instructions for calibration
      2. Sample calibration data
    3. Setting up the test environment
      1. Placement of equipment
      2. Supplies and materials required
      3. Equipment settings (filter settings, etc)
    4. Procedures for test
      1. Subject preparation (application of devices, warm up)
      2. Test protocol (trials, rest periods, etc)
      3. Sampling protocols (sampling rates, sampling time periods, etc)
      4. Sample test data
    5. Analysis of data
      1. Summary of analysis techniques
      2. Select a common analysis technique
        1. procedures for analysis
        2. Sample analysis data
    6. Product:  This information should all be placed in a WORD or Power Point document and distributed to the members of the class and sent to the digital dropbox on Blackboard
    7. Grading = 75 pts.
      1. Thoroughness of material
      2. Accuracy of material
      3. Organization of material for clarity (figures, photos, etc)
      4. Quality and presentation of data collected

 

  1. Step by step demonstration and participation in data collection.  (1-2 hours)
    1. Review of how other researchers are using the instrumentation
    2. Review of procedures
    3. Demonstration of data collection – take class members through a data collection
    4. Review of analysis
    5. Demonstration of analysis
    6. Grading = 75 pts
      1. Organization and quality of information in the presentation
      2. Demonstrated competency in setting up and administering the test and completing an analysis

Grading:
A 93 - 100% C+ 77 - 79%
A- 90 - 92% C 73 - 76%
B+ 89 - 89% C- 70 - 72%
B 83 - 86% D+ 67 - 69%
B- 80 - 82% D 63 - 66%
References:
Robertson, D.G., Caldwell, G.E., Hamill, J., Kamen, G., & Whittlesey, S.N. (2004). Research Methods in Biomechanics. Champaign, Ill.: Human Kinetics.


LOG

 

NAME:

 

Week

Mon

Tues

Wed

Thurs

Fri

Saturday

Sunday

6-9 Jan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12-16 Jan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

19-23 Jan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

26-30 Jan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2-6 Feb

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9-13 Feb

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16-20 Feb

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

23-27 Feb

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2-6 Mar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9-13 Mar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16-20 Mar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Place hours in each cell and have a classmate who was working with you initial your hours.